Occupational Services

Immunization Resources

Lake Health offers immunizations to protect and prevent illness. Our facilities follow The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for the administration of all vaccinations. To meet the varied needs of employers and employees, services are available through voucher programs at all of our urgent care centers or through pre-scheduled on-site programs.

Influenza Vaccination

Lake Health Occupation Services can either host a yearly on-site flu shot program for employees or provide vouchers to be used at any Lake Health Urgent Care Center. Either option can be billed directly to your company. The flu shot is approved for use in people older than 6 months, including healthy people and people with chronic medical conditions. It is administered with a needle in the arm.

Hepatitis B Vaccination

Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a serious, lifelong illness. Hepatitis B is usually spread through blood, semen, or another body fluid from an infected person. This can happen through sexual contact or sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment. Hepatitis B can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby at birth. It is recommended that first responders (EMS and paramedics) be vaccinated for hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B Vaccination Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How is the hepatitis B vaccine series given?
A: It is usually given as a series of 3 shots over a 6-month period.

Q: Is the hepatitis B vaccine series effective?
A: Yes, the vaccine is very effective at preventing hepatitis B virus infection. After receiving all three doses, hepatitis B vaccine provides greater than 90% protection to infants, children and adults immunized before being exposed to the virus.

Q: Is the hepatitis B vaccine safe?
A: Yes. As with any medicine, there are very small risks that a serious problem could occur after getting the vaccine. However, the potential risks associated with hepatitis B are much greater than the risks the vaccine poses. Soreness at the injection site is the most common side effect.

Q: Is it harmful to have an extra dose of hepatitis B vaccine or to repeat the entire hepatitis B vaccine series?
A: No, getting extra doses of hepatitis B vaccine is not harmful.

Q: What should be done if hepatitis B vaccine series was not completed?
A: Talk to your health professional to resume the vaccine series as soon as possible.

Q: Who should not receive the hepatitis B vaccine?
A: The hepatitis B vaccine is not recommended for people who have had serious allergic reactions to a prior dose of hepatitis B vaccine or to any part of the vaccine. Also, it is not recommended for anyone who is allergic to yeast, which is used to make the vaccine. Tell your doctor if you have any severe allergies.

Q: Are booster doses of hepatitis B vaccine necessary?
A: It depends. A “booster” dose of hepatitis B vaccine is a dose that increases or extends the effectiveness of the vaccine. Booster doses are recommended only for hemodialysis patients and can be considered for other people with a weakened immune system. Booster doses are not recommended for people with a normal immune status who have been fully vaccinated.

Hepatitis A Vaccination

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis A virus. It can range in severity from a mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months. Hepatitis A is usually spread when a person ingests fecal matter, even in microscopic amounts, from contact with objects, food, or drinks contaminated by the feces or stool of an infected person.

It is recommended that employees who have the potential to be exposed to fecal matter in their jobs be vaccinated for hepatitis A. Frequent hand washing with soap and water after using the rest room, changing a diaper or before food preparation can help prevent the spread of this disease.

Hepatitis A Vaccination Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How is the hepatitis A vaccine given?
A: The hepatitis A vaccine is given as two shots, 6 months apart.

Q: Is the hepatitis A vaccine effective?
A: Yes, protection begins approximately 2 to 4 weeks after the first injection. A second injection results in long-term protection.

Hepatitis C Vaccination

Currently, there is no vaccination for hepatitis C.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Vaccination

Lake Health offers the MMR immunization for people who have not been previously vaccinated. It is recommended that all health care professionals be immunized against MMR.

Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccination

We also offer Varicella immunization for people who have not been previously vaccinated. It is recommended that all health care professionals be immunized against Varicella as well.

For more information or to arrange an on-site program, please call Lake Health Occupational Services at 440-354-1990 or email Chris Brill-Packard.